Other Events, 2016
Other Events, 2016
January 7, 2016Physics colloquium: Stephan Meyer, University of Chicago, "First results from the Fermilab Holometer testing space-time correlations at the Planck scale"
February 9, 20162015-2016 Brinson Lecture: Francis Halzen, "Ice Fishing for Neutrinos"
February 11, 2016Physics colloquium: Daniel Holz, University of Chicago, "Update on LIGO and Gravitational Waves"
February 25, 2016Physics colloquium: Scott Wakely, University of Chicago, "Isotope Hunting at 100,000ft: Tracking Cosmic-Ray Clocks with HELIX"
March 28, 2016Cafe Scientifique: Erik Shirokoff, "Using nano-scale devices at the South Pole to study the most distant objects in the Universe"
April 7, 2016Broader Horizons: Joshua Carter, quantitative analyst at Citadel in Chicago
April 9, 2016UChicago Conference: "Space: Speculation and Exploration"
April 14, 2016Joshua Frieman in the Deborah Stratman film "The Illinois Parables"
April 14, 2016The World's Oldest Computer: The Antikythera Mechanis
April 15, 2016Astronomy Conversations Training Session
April 18, 2016Chicago Astronomy on Tap
April 21, 2016Astrophysics for Older Adults
May 5, 2016Kavli Lecture: Michael Turner, "From The Big Bang To The Multiverse & Beyond"
May 19, 2016The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty at 20: Prospects for Ratification and the Enduring Risks of Nuclear Testing
August 7, 2016Windy City Physics Slam: Where Particle Physicists Collide
October 24, 20162016 Leon Lederman Lecture: Rocky Kolb, "The Mysterious Dark Universe"
October 24, 2016Cafe Scientifique: Dan Scolnic, "Tension in the Universe: Dark Energy, Dark Matter & Different Numbers"
October 27, 2016Argonne OutLoud: Clarence Chang, "To the ends of the Earth...and the beginning of the cosmos"
November 3, 2016Physics colloquium: Elisabeth Krause, Stanford University/SLAC, "Dark Energy Science with the Dark Energy Survey, and Beyond"

 
Physics colloquium: Stephan Meyer, University of Chicago, "First results from the Fermilab Holometer testing space-time correlations at the Planck scale"
January 7, 2016 | 4:00 PM | KPTC 106
I will describe the first measurement of high-frequency differential arm length fluctuations using the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of co-located 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers. The instrument obtains differential position sensitivity to cross-correlated signal in a broad frequency band extending above the 3.8 MHz free spectral range of the apparatus. A model of universal exotic spatial shear correlations that matches the Plank scale holographic information bound of space-time position states is excluded to 4.6 sigma significance.

Related Links:
KICP Members: Stephan S. Meyer
 
2015-2016 Brinson Lecture: Francis Halzen, "Ice Fishing for Neutrinos"
February 9, 2016 | 6:00 PM | School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 112 South Michigan Ave., MacLean Ballroom
Website

Francis Halzen, 2015-2016 Brinson Lecturer

Francis Halzen is a theoretical physicist who works at the interface of particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. He is the Principal Investigator for IceCube, the world's largest neutrino detector, the Director of the Institute for Elementary Particle Physics, and the Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Among his recent honours are the 2015 Balzan Prize, the European Physical Society Prize for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in 2015; the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award for Physical Sciences in 2014; the Physics World Breakthrough of the Year Award for making the first observation of cosmic neutrinos; and the International Hemholtz Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany.

2015-2016 Brinson Lecture: "Ice Fishing for Neutrinos"
IceCube is a strange telescope which looks down rather then up. It is located at the South Pole and it is BIG (a cubic kilometer) with eighty-six holes over 1.5 miles deep melted into the Antarctic icecap. IceCube recently discovered a flux of neutrinos reaching us from deep in the cosmos, with energies more than a million times greater then those humans can produce in accelerators. These energetic neutrinos are astronomical messengers from some of the most violent processes in the universe including: starbursts, giant black holes gobbling up stars in the heart of quasars and gamma-ray bursts, the biggest explosions since the Big Bang. We will explore the IceCube telescope, its recent scientific results, and working at the South Pole.

This event is co-sponsored by the University of Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.
Read more >>
 
Physics colloquium: Daniel Holz, University of Chicago, "Update on LIGO and Gravitational Waves"
February 11, 2016 | 4:00 PM | KPTC 106
Image credit: LIGO Laboratory
Physics Colloquium at 4 pm February KPTC 106: KICP member Daniel Holz will speak, "Update on LIGO and Gravitational Waves"

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the first publication of Albert Einstein’s prediction of the existence of gravitational waves. The advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has been designed to search for these waves. We will provide an update.

Related Links:
KICP Members: Daniel E. Holz
 
Physics colloquium: Scott Wakely, University of Chicago, "Isotope Hunting at 100,000ft: Tracking Cosmic-Ray Clocks with HELIX"
February 25, 2016 | 4:00 PM | KPTC 106


Related Links:
KICP Members: Scott P. Wakely
 
Cafe Scientifique: Erik Shirokoff, "Using nano-scale devices at the South Pole to study the most distant objects in the Universe"
March 28, 2016 | 7:00 PM | Map Room
Some of the most distant objects in the Universe can only be studied with submillimeter wavelength instruments. These ancient objects include the cosmic microwave background - relic radiation left over from the the Big Bang - and the galaxies that hosted the first generation of stars. To see these distant signals we employ microscopic superconducting devices operating a fraction of a degree above absolute zero. And to see through the earth's atmosphere, we operate telescopes in some the most remote locations on Earth, including the South Pole and the Atacama Desert. We will talk about the instruments, the remote observatories we're building, and what we hope to reveal with them.

Related Links:
KICP Members: Erik Shirokoff
 
Broader Horizons: Joshua Carter, quantitative analyst at Citadel in Chicago
April 7, 2016 | 4:00 PM | ERC 401
I joined Citadel as a quantitative researcher in 2013 after completing a Hubble Fellowship. Citadel is a Chicago-based global financial institution offering asset management, retail execution/market making and trading technologies. Quantitative researchers (or "quants") are responsible for developing, testing and maintaining sophisticated, automated trading models. I will give a candid overview of this sector, giving my personal experience and offering advice for a similar transition.
 
UChicago Conference: "Space: Speculation and Exploration"
April 9, 2016 | 9:00 AM | International House Assembly Hall
Website

The University of Chicago's Conference titled "Space: Speculation and Exploration" is a day long event, hosting speakers from across the country. The conference aims to inspire public fascination and contemplation of the universe by connecting renowned professors and experts on space from various fields of science, economics, politics, and fiction with University of Chicago students and community members.

KEYNOTE
Robert Rosner- University of Chicago Professor in Astronomy and Astrophysics and Physics

SCIENCE PANEL
Jay M. Pasachoff- Williams College Professor in Astronomy
Brian Fields- University of Illinois Professor in Astronomy
Grace Wolf-Chase- Adler Planetarium Astronomer
Zoltan G. Levay - Imaging Group Lead in the Office of Public Outreach at Space Telescope Science Institute
Scott Sandford- NASA Astrophysicist

BUSINESS AND POLITICS PANEL
Eligar Sadeh- CEO of Astroconsulting
Charles Blandchard- former General Counsel of the Air Force and the Army
David Livingston- Host of The Space Show

FICTION PANEL
Eric S. Rabkin- University of Michigan Professor of English Language and Literature and Professor of Art & Design
Robert J. Scherrer- Vanderbilt University Professor and Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy and science fiction blogger
John Hemry- New York Times Best Selling Author of The Lost Fleet series
Robert Buettner- National Bestselling Author of Jason Wander and Orphan's Legacy series
Read more >>

Related Links:
KICP Members: Robert Rosner
 
Joshua Frieman in the Deborah Stratman film "The Illinois Parables"
April 14, 2016 | 6:00 PM | Gene Siskel Film Center
Website

For the last 25 years, Deborah Stratman (BFA 1990) has explored the landscape of our national history and psyche in riveting films, sculpture, sound, and public works. With THE ILLINOIS PARABLES, she turns her attention to the “American microcosm” and its storied past. Bracketed by sweeping aerial shots of the state’s ancient prairies and waterways, Stratman spins eleven tales of natural disaster, messianic devotion, technological breakthrough, government resistance, and unsolved mystery. Together, these stories ask how the systems of belief they represent have shaped how we see the land, ourselves, and our nation. 16mm. (Amy Beste)
Read more >>

Related Links:
KICP Members: Joshua A. Frieman
 
The World's Oldest Computer: The Antikythera Mechanis
April 14, 2016 | 6:30 PM | National Hellenic Museum | 333. South Halstead
Website

More than 21 centuries ago, Greek scientists created a mechanism that used brass gearwheels to predict the movements of the sun, the moon, and probably most of the planets, essentially inventing the world's first computer.

Found by Greek sponge divers in an ancient shipwreck, its corroded remnants, now known as the Antikythera Mechanism give us fresh insights into history and challenge our assumptions about technology transfer over the ages.

Dr. John Seiradakis, Radio Astronomer and Physics Professor at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, will discuss the work of an international team of experts who used 21st century technology to decode the truth behind the world's first computer.

This program will also feature the artwork of two local artists inspired by the Antikythera Mechanism: Terry Poulos and Keith Skogstrom.
Read more >>
 
Astronomy Conversations Training Session
April 15, 2016 | 4:00 PM | Adler Planetarium
Join us for a volunteer training session where you will learn about the Astronomy Conversations Program, the Adler Space Visualization Lab and science communication techniques.

SVL and Astronomy Conversations

Related Links:
KICP Members: Randall H. Landsberg
 
Chicago Astronomy on Tap
April 18, 2016 | 7:00 PM | The Map Room
This Monday, April 18, is the inaugural Chicago Astronomy on Tap! For those who are unfamiliar with the concept, Astronomy on Tap is a public outreach initiative at bars across 10 US cities (and Santiago, Chile) that involves informal astronomy talks and astronomy trivia (and beer!). This event will be held at The Map Room (off the blue line, 1949 N. Hoyne) at 7 pm, and Laura will be giving a talk on 'Prospects for Detecting Alien Life in the Next Decade.' We hope to see you there!
 
Astrophysics for Older Adults
April 21, 2016 | 4:00 PM | ERC 401
Gerontologist Karen Kolb Flude
Presenters: Karen Kolb Flude, Daniel Grin.

Beginning in 2013, the KICP has developed an astrophysics outreach effort to older adults (formerly known as senior citizens). This program has brought fundamental and cutting-edge content in astronomy to older adults at Chicago senior centers, retirement homes, and public libraries. The material has been presented by graduate students, postdocs, and faculty at the KICP, the University of Chicago's Astronomy/Astrophysics Department, Physics Department, and even broader pool including biologists at the UofC, as well as scientists at FermiLab, the Adler Planetarium, and the Field Museum. After briefly introducing the program, we'll cover how to effectively reach out to this audience. This event is a perfect entry point to participate in the program! After a ~1 hour presentation, participants will have an opportunity to present slides for critique and improvement, and discuss the program more informally.

Related Links:
KICP Members: Daniel Grin
 
Kavli Lecture: Michael Turner, "From The Big Bang To The Multiverse & Beyond"
May 5, 2016 | 7:30 PM | Adler Planetarium
Michael Turner, Director of the Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics and the Bruce V. and Diana M. Rauner Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago
Website

Lecture Flyer [PDF]

7:30 pm - 9:00 pm: Lecture and Q&A Session
9:00 pm - 10:00 pm: Speaker Reception with Refreshments

Presented by The Kavli Foundation
The Kavli Foundation fulldome lecture will be streamed live at fourteen other institutions including the American Museum of Natural History (NY, NY), the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and the Pacific Science Center (Seattle, WA). This dome-cast will allow audiences across the country to immerse themselves in the presentation in real time and ask questions.

We know the Universe began 13.7 billion years ago in an explosion of space called the Big Bang. We also know that the gravity of dark matter created the galaxies and other cosmic structures we see today from tiny quantum fluctuations that arose just after the Big Bang. Yet some big questions remain.

Is our Universe part of a larger multiverse? What is speeding up the expansion of the Universe? These are the mysteries that inspire cosmologists today. In a dazzling, fulldome presentation, this presentation will illustrate what we know and how we know it, as well as the big ideas and puzzles of cosmology today.

On May 5, the University of Chicago's Michael Turner will explore some of the biggest mysteries in modern cosmology.

About Michael Turner
Michael S. Turner is a theoretical astrophysicist and the Bruce V. and Diana M. Rauner Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. He is also Director of the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at Chicago. Turner helped to pioneer the interdisciplinary field of particle astrophysics and cosmology, and has made seminal contributions to the current cosmological paradigm known as "LambdaCDM", including the prediction of cosmic acceleration. His current research interests are dark matter, dark energy and inflation. Turner has won numerous prizes and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

About the Kavli Fulldome Lecture Series
The Kavli Fulldome Lecture series takes audiences on a journey to the very edges of human knowledge. Adler experts and leading scientists work together to create dazzling, animated images of real data, which are projected onto the planetarium dome during the lectures. Audiences don't have to imagine what an equation might tell us about the Universe’s distant past, they can travel back in time and see it with their own eyes.

Current list of institutions participating in the dome-cast:
  1. American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
  2. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO
  3. Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA
  4. Cradle of Aviation Museum, Garden City, NY
  5. Minnesota State University Moorhead, Moorhead, MN
  6. Gary E. Sampson Planetarium, Wauwatosa, WI
  7. Casper Planetarium, Casper, WY
  8. Bell Museum of Natural History, Minneapolis, MN
  9. Peoria Riverfront Museum, Peoria, IL
  10. H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, Vancouver, BC
  11. The Journey Museum and Learning Center, Rapid City, SD
  12. Aldo Leopold Nature Center, Madison, WI
  13. Marshall W. Alworth Planetarium, University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN
  14. Jackson Middle School Observatory, Champlin, MN
  15. University of Alaska Ankorage, Anchorage, AK

Read more >>

Related Links:
KICP Members: Michael S. Turner
 
The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty at 20: Prospects for Ratification and the Enduring Risks of Nuclear Testing
May 19, 2016 | 5:00 PM | ERC 501
The AAAS 2016 Distinguished Morton L. Mandel Annual Public Lecture, which will be livestreamed in the Astro Lounge on Thurs. May 19 at 5 pm.

"The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty at 20: Prospects for Ratification and the Enduring Risks of Nuclear Testing"

Twenty years after the signing of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (ctbt) and creation of its accompanying organization, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (ctbto), the ctbt remains extremely relevant in the context of nuclear proliferation, deterrence, testing, and more. Yet challenges also remain that impede the ratification of the treaty and its entry into force. On Thursday, May 19, 2016, the American Academy invites you to participate in a discussion on nuclear testing and the prospects of the ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Participants at the University of Chicago will watch a livestream of a panel discussion held at the American Academy's headquarters in Cambridge, MA, featuring the speakers listed below. Following the panel discussion, Rachel Bronson will moderate a dynamic discussion at the University of Chicago.

Lassina Zerbo
Executive Secretary, Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization

Rose E. Gottemoeller
Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, U.S. Department of State

Robert Rosner
William E. Wrather Distinguished Service Professor in the Departments of Astronomy & Astrophysics and Physics, and the Enrico Fermi Institute and the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago

Siegfried Hecker
Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies; Research Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University

Arun Rath
Correspondent, npr and wgbh

Rachel Bronson
Executive Director & Publisher Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Featuring

Related Links:
KICP Members: Robert Rosner
 
Windy City Physics Slam: Where Particle Physicists Collide
August 7, 2016 | 3:00 PM
Website

Come see five particle physicists from around the world put on a show about the mysteries of the universe. In a high-energy competition, they'll share the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy, shine a light on ghostly neutrinos, and uncover the very structure of the universe.

Host
Tom Skilling, WGN-TV chief meteorologist

Featured Speakers

  • Renee Hlozek, "The Death of the Universe: A Musical"
    Assistant Professor of Astrophysics, Dunlap Institute and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto; TED Senior Fellow
  • Dan Hooper, "Hunting for Dark Matter: The 'Soul' of the Universe"
    Associate Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago; Scientist II, Fermilab
  • Chris Marshall, "'MC Truth' Raps About Neutrinos"
    Graduate student, University of Rochester
  • Clara Nellist, "Picturing Particles: From Bubbles to Bosons"
    Particle Physicist, LAL-Orsay /IN2P3 / CNRS, France
  • Mariel Pettee,"The Electron Slingshot"
    Physics PhD Candidate, Yale University

Read more >>

Related Links:
KICP Members: Daniel Hooper
 
2016 Leon Lederman Lecture: Rocky Kolb, "The Mysterious Dark Universe"
October 24, 2016 | 3:30 PM | Illinois Institute of Technology
Website

Edward W. "Rocky" Kolb of the University of Chicago will give the 2016 Leon Lederman Lecture in Physics on Monday, October 24 from 3:30-5 p.m. in the Robert A. Pritzker Science Center, Room 111.

Kolb is the Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished Service Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics at Chicago. The eminent cosmologist studies the application of elementary particle physics to the very early universe.

In his lecture "The Mysterious Dark Universe," he will explore how the answer to the question of what the universe is made of is not simple. Astronomical observations tell us that 95 percent of the universe is missing. Most of the mass of the universe is in a mysterious form known as dark matter, and most of the energy in the universe is in an even more mysterious form known as dark energy. Dark matter and dark energy will determine the ultimate fate of our universe, Kolb says; understanding the nature of the dark universe is the biggest challenge facing cosmology today.

Kolb is a member of the Enrico Fermi Institute and the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at Chicago, as well as dean of physical sciences. In 1983, he helped to found the Theoretical Astrophysics Group and in 2004 was the founding director of the Particle Astrophysics Center at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Physical Society, among many other awards and honors. In addition to over 200 scientific papers, he is a co-author of The Early Universe, the standard textbook on particle physics and cosmology. Read more.

"Rocky Kolb is an excellent and accomplished astro-particle physicist with an outstanding ability to make complex concepts understandable to the public, said Grant Bunker, chair and professor of physics.

The lecture is sponsored by the Department of Physics and honors physicist Leon Lederman, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1988 with Melvin Schwartz and Jack Steinberger and was the Pritzker Professor of Physics at Illinois Tech from 1992-2012. Members of the physics faculty and others have pledged money to permanently endow the Lederman lecture.
Read more >>

Related Links:
KICP Members: Edward W. Kolb
 
Cafe Scientifique: Dan Scolnic, "Tension in the Universe: Dark Energy, Dark Matter & Different Numbers"
October 24, 2016 | 7:00 PM | The Map Room, 1949 N. Hoyne
Dear Cafe Denizens,

As we transition from summer into fall, I am happy to announce our autumn cafe scientifique and an astronomy related movie screening.

"Tension in the Universe: Dark Energy, Dark Matter & Different Numbers" Dan Scolnic
Time & Date: 7-9 PM
Monday October 24, 2016
Location: The Map Room, 1949 N. Hoyne
(Free, Limited to first 50 Attendees)

(others can join the cafe email list at - Cafe Email list: http://tinyurl.com/cafelist )

Related Links:
KICP Members: Daniel Scolnic
 
Argonne OutLoud: Clarence Chang, "To the ends of the Earth...and the beginning of the cosmos"
October 27, 2016 | 6:30 PM | TCS Conference Center, ANL
Website

The depths of the cosmos can only be matched by the innumerable questions we have about it. Scientists have attempted for hundreds of years to gain a clear picture of how the universe was formed. Our current understanding of it is the best so far, but there is still so much more to know. But just how do researchers study the beginning the universe?

Physicist Clarence Chang (Argonne National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago) collaborates with a group of researchers using the South Pole Telescope, which is equipped with a unique Argonne-made sensor technology to measure and characterize thermal radiation signatures generated billions of years ago. He will also provide highlights of his research travels to the Antarctica and the South Pole.
Read more >>

Related Links:
KICP Members: Clarence L. Chang
 
Physics colloquium: Elisabeth Krause, Stanford University/SLAC, "Dark Energy Science with the Dark Energy Survey, and Beyond"
November 3, 2016 | 4:00 PM | KPTC 206
The accelerated expansion of the Universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in decades. It has inspired a new generation ambitious surveys to determine the fundamental nature of this acceleration - whether it is caused by a breakdown of general relativity, or by an exotic new form of energy, termed dark energy, that acts repulsively within general relativity. I will introduce the different measurement techniques used by these surveys, and describe the landscape of current and near future cosmological sky surveys, highlighting early results from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey. The unprecedented data quality and data volume of future surveys will require a new generation of analysis frameworks, and I will conclude by outlining some of the statistical and computational challenges for the interpretation of these data sets.